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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 61-65

Prevalence of pain in medical representatives using two-wheeler for daily commute


1 Senior Resident, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India
3 Deputy Director, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India
4 Specialist Grade I Officer, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India
5 Director, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India
6 Chief Medical Officer, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Vivek S Chawathe
Senior Resident Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, All India Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10046-0070

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Aim: To investigate the prevalence of pain in medical representatives exposed to two-wheeler riding compared with medical representatives using other modes of commuting. Materials and methods: A total of 105 medical representatives participated in the study with history of exposure to traveling of at least 300 minutes per week with at least 60 minutes per day for 5 days a week for more than 1 year. Fifty-two of them traveled by two-wheelers and were grouped under "two-wheeler group" and 53 were grouped under "control group" as they used bus, train, or car (not self-driven) as a mode of commute. The prevalence and intensity of pain was assessed by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for baseline pain and worst pain, Pain Disability Index (PDI), and the Pain diagram for the pain observed during last 2 weeks. Results: Statistically significant difference was observed in pain levels between the two groups (two-wheeler group vs control group): Numeric Rating Scale baseline pain (p= 0.0315), NRS worst pain (p = 0.0388), and PDI (p = 0.010). The pain scores of the two-wheeler group showed positive dose–response relation with time of exposure to riding. Thepain distribution pattern between two-wheeler group vs control group was quiet different with lower back pain 36 vs 23% and ankle foot pain 2 vs 12%. Conclusion: The study concludes that medical representativestraveling using two-wheelers as compared with bus, train, or car suffer from more cumulative trauma. Clinical significance: Two-wheeler users have significantly higher prevalence of pain and pain-associated disability due to cumulative trauma disorder, which warrants further studies to improve the depth of our understanding about cumulative traumas.


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